Find a Lawyer in Washington

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Lawyer Overview for Washington

Population:
7.5 million+
/
Number of active lawyers:
40,000+
/
Washington State  Bar Association:
website
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Featured Lawyers in Washington

Lawgena of Washington

Google rating
4.7
25 years in practice
Child Custody, Divorce Law, Domestic Violence, Paternity Law
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Lingenbrink Cazares Injury Law

Google rating
5
39 years in practice
Auto Accidents, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death
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Richard E. Lewis, PS

Google rating
5
44 years in practice
Auto Accidents, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death
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Law Offices of Shana E. Thompson

Google rating
4.1
22 years in practice
Alimony, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce & Family Law, Divorce Law
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Anderson, Fields & McIlwain, Inc., P.S.

Google rating
3.3
56 years in practice
Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce Law, Domestic Violence, Fathers Rights
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Seattle Divorce Services

Google rating
4.6
16 years in practice
Child Custody, Child Support, Prenups & Marital Agreement
View Profile

Need a lawyer in Washington?

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About the Washington Legal System

Washington has two federal district courts. There is also a state supreme and a state court.

Nonpartisan elections are used to select Washington state court judges. Multiple-term judges must run for reelection.

The Eastern District of Washington and the Western District are Washington's federal district courts.

Washington has two federal bankruptcy courts. These courts have jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases. The Eastern District of Washington Bankruptcy Court and the Western District of Washington Bankruptcy Court is Washington's federal bankruptcy courts.

The Washington Supreme Court was established in 1889 and currently has nine judgeships. The court decided on 1,269 cases in 2018. Four judges were elected by nonpartisan votes, and five were appointed to the court by a Democratic governor.

The Washington Court of Appeals serves as the intermediate appellate court in Washington. This court is an appellate court that does not have discretionary powers. It must accept, review, and issue a written decision on all appeals it receives, unlike the Washington State Supreme Court which can reject an appeal.

District Courts in Washington have limited jurisdiction over civil and criminal cases. This includes criminal misdemeanors and preliminary hearings in felony cases.

About Washington

Washington was named after George Washington in an act of Congress by the United States Congress in 1853 when Washington Territory was created. The territory was originally to be called "Columbia" for the Columbia River, Columbia District, and Columbia River. However, Richard H. Stanton, a Kentucky representative, found the name too similar and suggested naming the new territory after Washington. Washington is the only U.S. State named after a president.

The confusion over Washington's state and Washington, D.C. led to several renaming proposals in the 1889 statehood process. These included David Dudley Field II’s suggestion to call the new state "Tacoma". However, these proposals were rejected. Washington, D.C.'s own statehood movement for the 21st Century included a proposal to use the "State of Washington, Douglass State", which would be in conflict with Washington. Washingtonians and Pacific Northwest residents simply refer to Washington as Washington, and Washington, D.C.'s capital as Washington, D.C., or simply D.C.

Washington Lawyer FAQs

How much does a lawyer cost in Washington?

While prices between lawyers may vary, the average price per hour for a lawyer is between $120 and $380 per hour. Since prices may vary, be sure to ask potential lawyers for their pricing information before moving forward with them.

How do I find a lawyer in Washington?

With Attorney At Law’s search widget, it’s easy to find lawyers near you. Just select the practice area you’re looking for and the location you need, and AAL will automatically gather all relevant results.

How many active attorneys are there in Washington?

There are approximately 40,000+ active lawyers in the state of Washington. This number reflects all lawyers registered with The State Bar of Washington.

Who licenses attorneys in Washington?

The Washington State Bar licenses all attorneys in Washington. A lawyer that is not licensed by the state bar association cannot practice law in full capacity.

How can I get free advice?

If you’re looking for free advice, you can browse hundreds of articles on Attorney At Law’s blog, or reach out for free advice.

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