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Find No-Fault Insurance Lawyer

Find No-Fault Insurance Lawyer

No-Fault Insurance

Insurance exists to cover expenses in the event of an accident. In the normal course of action insurance companies will first determine fault and then proceed to assess claims. However, some states skip this phase of assessing claims and instead move to institute a mandatory, no-fault insurance policy.


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Jane Gordon Law

2 years in practice
Animal Bites, Auto Accidents, Bicycle Accidents, Brain Injury, Maritime Injury
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Craig A. Davis, APLC

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30 years in practice
Animal Bites, Auto Accidents, Bad Faith Insurance, Bicycle Accidents, Birth Injury
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Scott R. Scherr, P.A., Attorney at Law

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32 years in practice
Auto Accidents, Crimes and Aggravation, Criminal Appeals, Criminal Defense, Criminal Trials and Juries
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Jane Gordon Law

2 years in practice
Animal Bites, Auto Accidents, Bicycle Accidents, Brain Injury, Maritime Injury
View Profile

Craig A. Davis, APLC

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30 years in practice
Animal Bites, Auto Accidents, Bad Faith Insurance, Bicycle Accidents, Birth Injury
View Profile

Scott R. Scherr, P.A., Attorney at Law

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32 years in practice
Auto Accidents, Crimes and Aggravation, Criminal Appeals, Criminal Defense, Criminal Trials and Juries
View Profile

Coverage Regardless of Cause

No-fault insurance exists to bypass the stages of assigning fault in order to expedite the claims process and reduce the burdens on the courts. Standard no-fault insurance often consists of bodily injury liability, property damage liability, and personal injury protection.

Bodily Injury Liability

Bodily injury liability exists to compensate the other driver and their passengers for any physical harms suffered as the result of a car accident. Because of the nature of no-fault insurance claims, both parties can claim bodily injury liability and potentially receive compensation from the other’s insurance.

Property Damage Liability

Property damage liability coverage exists to compensate other drivers or individuals who have their property damaged as a result of a car accident. This includes not only the other driver’s damages but also any damage to public property, such as signs or lampposts, or private property, such as fencing or a mailbox.

Personal Injury Protection

Personal injury protection is designed to provide for the medical expenses and lost income of individual drivers and their passengers. Personal injury protection claims must still be filed but do not require fault to be established before the claims can proceed.

Ensuring Coverage Amid Complexities

If you are seeking to navigate the complexities of no-fault insurance, you will need the help of an experienced insurance law attorney. An insurance law attorney is able to focus completely on your case, zealously advocate for your interests, and get you the best possible outcome.

In order to achieve this best outcome, however, you will need an attorney who has the expertise and resources to take your case all the way. That’s why you should contact Attorney at Law. By partnering with AAL, you will be able to avoid slogging through the quagmire of unscrupulous lawyers looking to exploit your case.

At AAL, we only partner with the best firms in your area, helping you find the best attorney for your case. Don’t wait, contact AAL today to be matched with skilled and experienced attorneys in your area who practice insurance law.

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No-Fault Insurance Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is no-fault insurance and how does it differ from traditional insurance?

No-fault insurance, also known as personal injury protection, is a type of coverage that is designed to compensate for medical expenses or loss of income in the event of a car accident regardless of who was at fault. This is different from traditional insurance that seeks to determine fault to find which company’s insurance should cover the expenses. 

2. What does a no-fault insurance policy typically cover?

No-fault insurance typically covers medical expenses for a driver and any passengers in their vehicle at the time of the accident. No-fault insurance can cover bodily injury, property damage, and personal injury. Notably, no-fault insurance does not automatically cover damages to the individual’s vehicle.

3. How does the claims process work under a no-fault insurance system?

As opposed to at-fault insurance which requires fault to be determined following an incident, no-fault insurance immediately begins the process of dispensing compensation to individuals who file a claim.

4. Are there any limitations or exclusions to coverage under a no-fault insurance policy?

No-fault insurance covers three things: bodily injury to the other driver, property damage caused by the individual, and medical expenses associated with the individual and their passengers as a result of the accident. Notably, no-fault insurance does not automatically cover damage to the driver’s vehicle.

5. How does no-fault insurance impact the ability to file a lawsuit or seek additional compensation after an accident?

Living in no-fault states that do not assess blame can make it more difficult to receive additional compensation. Because the state does not outright assess compensation based on blame, it is an uphill battle to receive a verdict favoring the plaintiff if an individual chooses to file a lawsuit against either the insurance company or the individual.

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